Social Studies 10 - Demo

The Social Studies 10 disk has a total of 400 questions.

Examine the passages below before answering questions # 12 to 15.

Province A

This province earns more dollars from manufacturing than any other. In the northern part of the province, it has excellent hydro-electric capability and is a storehouse of metallic ores. In the southern region, it houses a large domestic market and a waterway which connects it to foreign markets. Also, this province is home to the "Fertile Triangle" where consistent rainfall, and an amply long growing season, allow for the growing of tobacco, fruits and vegetables for the local market.

Province B

This province experiences the greatest problem with unemployment of all provinces in our confederation; having had the highest unemployment rate in the nation for decades. This is primarily due to a rocky terrain which is generally not suited for agriculture. The primary industry here is fishing, which has been in decline recently given the introduction of quotas, and a limitation on fishing, in order to conserve the fish stock found in the area. This province is hoping that off-shore drilling for oil will provide greater economic stability in the future.

Province C

The province is reliant on two economic activities: agriculture and petroleum. Because of limited precipitation and a short growing season, this province tends to be primarily a grain producer. Where precipitation is too limited, ranching for beef production occurs. As a petroleum producer, this province is the primary producer in the nation having pipelines carry oil both to the manufacturing centers of Canada and southward towards American markets.

Province D

This province is novel as the primary, and almost exclusive, producer of potash in Canada. Besides mining this mineral, this province's economy is dependent upon one activity, grain farming. Indeed, as farming as become more mechanized, and as farms have become larger, this province has witnessed significant emigration of its population to other parts of the country.

12.
Passage A characterizes which Canadian province?
  1. British Columbia
  2. Ontario
  3. Quebec
  4. Alberta
13.
Passage B characterizes which Canadian province?
  1. Quebec
  2. Prince Edward Island
  3. Newfoundland
  4. Nova Scotia
14.
Passage C characterizes which Canadian province?
  1. British Columbia
  2. Alberta
  3. Saskatchewan
  4. Manitoba
15.
Passage D characterizes which Canadian province?
  1. British Columbia
  2. Alberta
  3. Saskatchewan
  4. Manitoba

Examine the chart below to assist you in answering questions # 33 to 35.

33.
If one look at the top five source nations from 1980 to 1990, you could ascertain that there is a greater shift towards more immigrants coming to Canada from the:
  1. other nations in North America
  2. European states
  3. Asian states
  4. South American states
34.
Which of the following could not be PROVEN by the data shown above?
  1. Immigration to Alberta has remained relatively the same from 1980 to 1990.
  2. Fewer Soviets were coming to Alberta in 1990 than in 1980.
  3. Fewer immigrants of British descent were coming to Alberta in 1990 than was the case in 1980.
  4. A wider range of immigrants, coming from more different nations, occurred in 1980 than in 1990.
35.
Of the nations shown below, which nation saw the greatest decrease in terms of the number of people emigrating to Alberta?
  1. United States
  2. Vietnam
  3. Hong Kong
  4. England
36.
Which of the following geographic sites are INCORRECTLY matched with the region where they are located?
  1. Beaufort Sea - North West Territories
  2. Queen Charlotte Islands - British Columbia
  3. Anticosti Island - Maritimes
  4. Cape Breton Island - Yukon

Examine the passage below before answering questions # 65 to 67.

In 1867 the United States purchased Alaska from Russia. Unfortunately, at the time, the specific boundary between Canada and the United States was not clearly defined. This lack of clarity was not problematic until the gold rush of the late 1890's when Canada and the United States began contesting specifically how far down the Pacific coast the Alaskan boundary went. Because Canada was still a British colony at the time, Britain represented us in the negotiations with the United States.

It was eventually decided by the two sides that each side would choose three judges who would collectively determine the boundary for the two states. The Americans chose three U.S. judges while Britain chose two Canadian judges and one British judge. The boundary established went much further south along the Pacific coast than Canada had hoped for; in short, the decision favoured the Americans. Canadians felt that Britain were more concerned about preventing conflict, and possible warfare, with the United States than they were in protecting Canadian territory. Canadians generally felt that the British put pressure on the British judge to make a decision which would appease the U.S. Needless to say, many Canadians developed hard feelings towards Britain.

65.
The territory in the dispute highlighted in the passage was the:
  1. George's Bank area
  2. Pacific Panhandle area
  3. San Juan Island area
  4. Juan de Fuca Strait area
66.
The British involvement in this dispute best demonstrates the lack of Canadian:
  1. sovereignty in the area of domestic policy making.
  2. sovereignty in the area of foreign affairs.
  3. willingness to relinquish nationalist objectives in the area of domestic policy making.
  4. willingness to relinquish nationalist objectives in the area of foreign affairs.
67.
The British decision BEST highlights:
  1. the British desire to put territorial interests ahead of internationalist pursuits.
  2. the British dependence on the diplomatic resolution of disputes over judicial involvement.
  3. the British desire to exert its colonial control over Canadian affairs.
  4. the British putting fiscal management concerns ahead of internationalist pursuits.

Examine the passage below to assist you in answering questions # 91 to 93.

This piece of British legislation stated that Canada, as well as other British colonies, would be free to pass whatever laws they wanted required to provide proper governance within the boundaries of their nation. It stated that no future laws of the British legislature would impact the former colony's ability to make laws for its citizens; existing British statutes such as the Canadian constitution would remain in effect, however.

91.
The piece of legislation described throughout the passage was the:
  1. British North America Act
  2. Constitution Act of 1791
  3. Statute of New Westminster
  4. Act of Union
92.
The act detailed in the passage was an indication that the British were willing to relinquish their control over Canadian:
  1. foreign policy, but not its domestic policy.
  2. domestic policy, but not its foreign policy.
  3. foreign and domestic policy.
  4. international relations
93.
The Canadian constitution alluded to in the last sentence was the:
  1. British North America Act
  2. Constitution Act of 1982
  3. Statute of New Westminster
  4. Act of Union
107.
Which of the following circumstances MOST LIKELY resulted from Canada's participation in the First World War?
  1. Canadian society retained a traditional role for women.
  2. Canada realized increased status in international affairs.
  3. Canada became increasingly dependent on agriculture as the basis for economic growth.
  4. Canadian society experienced a greater degree of co-operation between English and French-speaking groups.
108.
During World War I and World War II Canada automatically had to assist Britain in the war despite the fact that this action would lead to internal conflicts in Canada between Francophones and Anglophones. For Canada's foreign policy, this situation represented a conflict between the values of:
  1. freedom and national security
  2. loyalty and national sovereignty
  3. patriotism and national security
  4. internationalism and national sovereignty

Examine the passage below to answer questions # 114 to 117.

How can we refuse to not help those who showed their patriotism to the Empire voluntarily and are left to perish without our assistance? This is not a dispute which only affects the Balkans, but potentially impacts all of Europe. We need to assist these patriots of Canada and the British Empire. We are part of the British Empire and must help protect it. Britain has done much in the past to build up Canada, it is now our time to assist her during her time of need. Further, there is no legal way that we can refuse to help Britain. We are legally bound to fulfill our commitment to the empire. We should do this in good faith and show Britain that we are worthy of additional sovereignty and freedom in the future.

114.
The author is PRIMARILY trying to get people to support for conscription by appealing to one's sense of:
  1. patriotism and obligation
  2. maintaining national security through collective action.
  3. morality and religious beliefs
  4. nationalism and sovereignty
115.
Evidence provided in the passage indicates that the comments made in the reading were made during:
  1. World War I
  2. Boar War
  3. Korean War
  4. World War II
116.
The individual who made the statements made the passage could BEST be described as being a(an):
  1. Internationalist
  2. Pacifist
  3. British Loyalist
  4. Militarist
117.
The individual who would have made statements similar to the one cited in the passage, as the Prime Minister fighting to have conscription introduced, was:
  1. Robert Borden
  2. Henri Bourassa
  3. Mackenzie King
  4. Lionel Groulx

Examine the passage below to assist you in answering questions # 129 and 130.

Article 5 of the NATO Treaty states that "an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe shall be considered an attack against them all." The concept behind NATO is that each member is afforded the protection that if they are attacked, all member nations will pool their military forces to assist them against the aggressor. Further, protection is afforded the signatory against an identified enemy, the U.S.S.R. and its satelite states, who in turn have their own military organization.

129.
The idea expressed in the quotation BEST defines:
  1. ultranationalism
  2. collective security
  3. national security
  4. internationalism
130.
The WARSAW PACT and NATO organizations are BEST described as:
  1. supranational agencies
  2. regional alliances
  3. domestic military organizations
  4. ideological agencies
155.
Which of the following statements represents Canada's position on issue of nuclear weapons?
  1. Canada is both in possession of nuclear weapons and has the technical capability of developing nuclear weapons.
  2. While Canada is in possession of nuclear weapons, it lacks the ability to develop these weapons on its own.
  3. While Canada has the ability to develop nuclear weapons, we have chosen to be nuclear weapon free.
  4. Canada is neither in possession of nuclear weapons, nor is she capable of developing these weapons.
156.
Which of the following is an activity Canada participates in as part of her commitment to NATO?
  1. developed the CANDU nuclear reactor.
  2. tested nuclear weapons in the Canadian Arctic.
  3. funded research for Strategic Defense Initiative (Star Wars).
  4. tested the cruise missile guidance system.
157.
Litton Industries, a very successful Canadian firm, have developed the:
  1. Canada Arm
  2. CANDU nuclear reactor
  3. Cruise Missile guidance system.
  4. ABM missile

Examine the passage below to assist you in answering questions # 161 to 167.

The concept behind this organization is that all nations of the world will work together towards achieving world peace. The attainment of peace is achieved in two ways. First, this organization can be used as a forum where nations can air their grievances, and this organization can provide recommendations which the nations in conflict can consider. Within this vein, there is the belief that no aggressor nation wishes to have its aggression put under the a spotlight in front of the world community. Second, an attack against one member of the world community could be countered by all nations of the world stopping the aggression, even if this involves the use of force.

This organization has two key components. One is the forum where all nations have equal representation. Each member-state has an equal vote and each can introduce any matter before the assembly it desires. Decisions made here are based upon a simple majority.

The second organization is a sub-committee specifically established to deal rapidly with crisis situations. This committee is comprised of five permanent members and ten others elected by the larger body. Permanent membership was provided the key world powers based upon the belief that no military action or major peacekeeping function could be successful unless the key powers agreed with the decision reached. In following with this idea, each of the "Big Five" have a veto vote over decisions made at this level.

161.
The organization described in the passage is the:
  1. G7
  2. GATT
  3. Commonwealth of Nations
  4. United Nations
162.
Those committed to this organization would place the greatest value on:
  1. national security
  2. internationalism
  3. internationalism
  4. brinkmanship
163.
The first paragraph details the UN's primary purpose which is peace-keeping. The UN has other functions. Which of the following is NOT one of the UN's function's?
  1. humanitarian pursuits attempting to improve social and economic conditions in developing states.
  2. an attempt to protect and improve upon human rights worldwide.
  3. an attempt to bring about disarmament.
  4. an attempt to improve world trade by removing protectionist policies.
164.
The last sentence in the first paragraph BEST provides a definition for:
  1. collective security
  2. an alliance
  3. military sanctions
  4. humanitarianism
165.
The part of this organization described in the first paragraph is the:
  1. International Court of Justice
  2. Security Council
  3. Economic and Social Council
  4. General Assembly
166.
The part of this organization described in second paragraph is the:
  1. International Court of Justice
  2. Security Council
  3. Economic and Social Council
  4. General Assembly
167.
Which of the following nations are not currently part of the "Big Five" described in the passage?
  1. People's Republic of China
  2. Britain
  3. Russia
  4. Japan

Examine the points below in answering questions # 202 and 203.

  1. This state is nuclear capable meaning it has the technology and knowledge to develop nuclear weapons if it wished to.
  2. This state, believing in nuclear disarmament, refuses to join any defense alliances.
  3. This state as a member of a nuclear alliance tests unarmed nuclear guidance systems.
  4. This state does not have nuclear weapons/warheads on its soil.
  5. This state sells nuclear weapons technology to other states.
  6. This state sells nuclear reactors, but only for peaceful purposes.
  7. This state is considered to be completely neutral and thus is not a member of the United Nations.
202.
Which of the statements above apply to Canada?
  1. I, III, V, VII
  2. II, III, IV, VI
  3. I, IV, V, VI
  4. I, III, IV, VI
203.
Greenpeace has been protesting which activity taking place in the province of Alberta?
  1. I
  2. III
  3. V
  4. VI

Examine the passage below before answering questions # 223 to 225.

This agreement was established in part to insure that Canadians received an adequate share of the jobs involved in building automobile parts and automobiles. At the time of the initial agreement Canadians produced 4% of the automobiles produced, yet purchased in excess of 7% of the automobiles produced in North America. Part of this agreement included the provision that companies that produce vehicles in Canada, while they could import parts and vehicles from the U.S., they must assembly vehicles in Canada whose value equaled their total sales in any given year in Canada. The agreement also stated that any automobile company set up in Canada had to put in a minimum of $60 worth of Canadian parts for each $100 worth of car sales in Canada.

223.
The agreement detailed above is part of the:
  1. NAFTA agreement
  2. U.S. - Canada Free Trade Agreement
  3. Auto Pact
  4. Hyde Park Agreement
224.
The portions of the agreement cited above tend to be:
  1. both protectionist and free trade oriented.
  2. free trade oriented and a move away from protectionism.
  3. protectionist in nature moving away from the principles of free trade.
  4. neither protectionist nor free trade oriented.
225.
The region of Canada which benefited the most from this agreement was:
  1. Atlantic Canada
  2. Central Canada
  3. Prairies
  4. British Columbia

Examine the points below before answering questions # 242 to 244.

  1. Migration Figures
  2. Post Secondary Education Levels
  3. Cost of Living Figures
  4. Proximity to Market
  5. Drop In Resource Demand
  6. Average Weekly Income
242.
If one was attempting to make the argument that the Yukon was regional ADVANTAGED, they would point to which of the signposts above?
  1. I and III
  2. II and III
  3. II and VI
  4. IV and VI
243.
If one wished to explain the downturn in the Alberta economy during the late 1980's and early 1990's, they would look at which signpost?
  1. II
  2. III
  3. IV
  4. V
244.
The PRIMARY reason why Canadian Northlands generally lack any major industrial development is:
  1. II
  2. III
  3. IV
  4. V

Examine the passage below to assist in answering questions # 284 to 286.

In 1968 a leader was elected Prime Minister who was seen as being capable of keeping the country together. It was believed that this individual, by virtue of the fact that he came from Quebec, would understand the grievances felt in Quebec and could come up with appropriate actions which would keep Quebec in Canada, and still keep the nation united as a whole. Towards this end, a commission was struck to study English-French relations. The commission came up with three key recommendations. These recommendations were as follows:

  1. English and French Canadians would have to learn to treat each other as equals.
  2. Francophones had to forget their previous, historic differences with English Canadians.
  3. Both French and English Canadians would have to recognize the multicultural nature of Canada and recognize the right of other cultures to practice their way of life.
284.
The commission quoted in the reading was the:
  1. Official Languages Commission
  2. Beaudoin-Dobie Commission
  3. Campeau-Belanger Commission
  4. Bilingualism and Biculturalism Commission
285.
The leader described in the passage was:
  1. Lester Pearson
  2. Louis St. Laurent
  3. Brian Mulroney
  4. Pierre Trudeau
286.
This act was attempting to:
  1. find a judicial solution to English-French relations.
  2. provide a federalist solution to English-French relations.
  3. establish sovereignty association.
  4. create unilingual zones to satisfy the various regions of Canada.

Examine the passage below to assist in answering questions # 284 to 286.

In 1968 a leader was elected Prime Minister who was seen as being capable of keeping the country together. It was believed that this individual, by virtue of the fact that he came from Quebec, would understand the grievances felt in Quebec and could come up with appropriate actions which would keep Quebec in Canada, and still keep the nation united as a whole. Towards this end, a commission was struck to study English-French relations. The commission came up with three key recommendations. These recommendations were as follows:

  1. English and French Canadians would have to learn to treat each other as equals.
  2. Francophones had to forget their previous, historic differences with English Canadians.
  3. Both French and English Canadians would have to recognize the multicultural nature of Canada and recognize the right of other cultures to practice their way of life.
284.
The commission quoted in the reading was the:
  1. Official Languages Commission
  2. Beaudoin-Dobie Commission
  3. Campeau-Belanger Commission
  4. Bilingualism and Biculturalism Commission
285.
The leader described in the passage was:
  1. Lester Pearson
  2. Louis St. Laurent
  3. Brian Mulroney
  4. Pierre Trudeau
286.
This act was attempting to:
  1. find a judicial solution to English-French relations.
  2. provide a federalist solution to English-French relations.
  3. establish sovereignty association.
  4. create unilingual zones to satisfy the various regions of Canada.

Examine the passage below before answering questions # 334 to 337.

This organization was established to regulated the radio and television airwaves in Canada. This organization approves licensing for radio and television stations and passes regulations which they must follow in order to maintain their license. In the area of television programming there is a requirement that at least 50% of all programming during prime time, defined as 6:00 p.m. to midnight, be Canadian productions. For radio, at least 30% of the songs played on AM radio must be "Canadian" records.

334.
The organization described in the reading is the:
  1. CBC
  2. CRTC
  3. NFB
  4. Canada Council
335.
The PRIMARY reason that this organization is finding it increasingly more difficult to control the airwaves because:
  1. new technologies like satelite dishes and cable TV provide us with more American signals.
  2. the courts have determined that the airwaves are for private and public use and therefore cannot be restricted or regulated.
  3. The costs associated with regulating the airwaves are prohibitive, especially during recessionary times.
  4. more and more Canadians are verbalizing their wish to have the airwaves not regulated in terms of Canadian content regulations.
336.
Television stations alter the intent of the regulations regarding Canadian content during "prime time" by:
  1. filling this time slot primarily with Canadian comedy sitcoms.
  2. showing a large number of Canadian mini-series or continuing dramas.
  3. selling Canadian productions, like "Kids In The Hall", to both Canadian and American networks.
  4. offering two hours of news and sports during this time block.

Examine the passage below to assist you in answering questions 355 to 360.

Concept A - there is a belief that all legislation should pass through two houses or legislative bodies before it become law. This concept is based upon the belief that legislation should receive a "sober second look" before becoming law.

Concept B - this is the situation where you have more than one level of government capable of passing laws and each level is supreme within their area of jurisdiction.

Concept C - in order to insure that each citizen's vote has approximately the same weighting, there is an attempt to insure that the number of citizens found in one constituency is relatively uniform to that found in another. While some exceptions are made to accommodate unusual geographic locations or large, sparse areas, there is a concerted attempt to keep representation within each constituency the same.

Concept D - because the powers assigned each level of government, as defined in a constitution cannot be exhaustive, there will always be some areas of jurisdiction not outlined or specified in the constitution. These unassigned rights have to automatically become the right of one level of government or another.

355.
Concept A is:
  1. federalism
  2. bicameral government
  3. residual power
  4. representation by population
356.
Concept B is:
  1. federalism
  2. bicameral government
  3. residual power
  4. representation by population
357.
Concept B is common to:
  1. Canada, Britain and the United States
  2. Britain and the United States only.
  3. Canada and the United States only.
  4. Canada and Britain only.
358.
Concept C is:
  1. federalism
  2. bicameral government
  3. residual power
  4. representation by population
359.
Concept D is:
  1. federalism
  2. bicameral government
  3. residual power
  4. representation by population




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